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The Dear Hunter Act IV: Rebirth In Reprise

(180g Colored Vinyl 2LP)

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Item: LDD29315

The Dear Hunter Act IV: Rebirth In Reprise on Colored 180g 2LP

First Pressing on Colored Vinyl

Colored Copies Are Limited / Call To Confirm Colored Copies Are Still Available


It’s been almost a decade since Casey Crescenzo brought The Dear Hunter – both the band and the character of the same name – to life with his 2006 debut full-length, Act I: The Lake South, The River North. Although it was evident from his stint as singer of The Receiving End Of Sirens, the record revealed Crescenzo’s incredibly inventive and ambitious musical flair, something which has been evolving ever since. The two albums which followed – 2007’s Act II: The Meaning Of, And All Things Regarding Ms. Leading and 2009’s Act III: Life And Death – cemented the now 32 year-old as a maverick, idiosyncratic talent whose music, while fitting a modern aesthetic, was also from a bygone era.

Anachronistic and timeless in equal measure, the narrative of The Dear Hunter existed in both the past and the present, its detailed plot standing simultaneously as an age-old and  new age fable. As that tale progressed, so did Crescenzo’s art, his experimental compositions blurring the line between different genres to create a sound that was – and still is – unique to the band. But then, halfway through the six envisioned acts of the Dear Hunter narrative, Crescenzo’s attentions shifted. Between 2010 and 2011, the band recorded a series of nine four-track EPs known as The Color Spectrum

Later released as a single volume edition, each EP was a musical interpretation of a color from the visible spectrum, showcasing the increasingly far-reaching ambitions for Crescenzo’s musical vision and his inventive interpretation of the world around him. Two years later, the more mellow and straightforward fifth full-length Migrant showcased a different side to the songwriter’s talents, and last year he composed and recorded his first symphony Amour & Attrition. With such a storied musical repertoire, its clear Crescenzo is no ordinary musician.

Now, six years and two albums after The Dear Hunter released Act III: Life And Death, Crescenzo has returned to the narrative of the anti-hero who shares the band’s name, applying all of the knowledge and experience of the last ten years to this new chapter. Picking up where the story left off – with the eponymous protagonist assuming the identity of his late brother and returning home – Act IV: Rebirth In Reprise is an album that explores the complex notions of who and what we are, and which attempts to answer its own questions through the wanderings and wonderings of the album’s protagonist. Yet as the plot and the music weave their way through these fifteen songs, it’s clear that they transcend the boundaries of the Dear Hunter story. This is as much about a return in real life as it is the fictional story.

The result is the band’s most orchestral and multi-layered set of songs to date. Both nuanced and euphoric – sometimes at the same time – their very essence breathes life back into a story that has been on pause for over half a decade, reigniting the lives of the characters with heart and aplomb. That’s something Crescenzo insists could only have happened by taking a break from the world with The Color Spectrum and Migrant. The distance that making those records afforded Crescenzo means that of all the albums The Dear Hunter has made, Act IV’s soundtrack to its main character’s physical and philosophical journey is also the closest Crescenzo has come to realizing the true musical vision inside his head.

Aside from a couple of brief pauses, Act IV is almost one continuous piece of music. Whether it’s the gracefully powerful lilt of “At The End Of The Earth”, the frantic, almost King Crimson-esque 9 minute epic surge of “A Night On The Town” or the angular guitars of “King Of Swords (Reversed)” – which Crescenzo says drew inspiration from unlikely sources such as ELO, Talking Heads and Michael Jackson – it all creates a sense of dramatic momentum to parallel all the physical and metaphysical action that takes place across this record’s ambitious 64 minutes. 
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1.  Rebirth
2.  The Old Haunt
3.  Waves
4.  At the End of the Earth
5.  Remembered
6.  A Night On the Town
7.  Is There Anybody Here
8.  The Squeaky Wheel
9.  The Bitter Suite IV and V: The Congregation and The Sermon in the Silt
10. The Bitter Suite VI – Abandon
11. King of Swords (Reversed)
12. If All Goes Well
13. The Line
14. Wait
15. Ouroboros

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